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dc.contributor.authorTsagala, Evrikleiaen
dc.contributor.authorKordaki, Mariaen
dc.coverage.spatialCY - Λευκωσίαen
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-12T09:34:39Z
dc.date.available2016-02-12T09:34:39Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10797/14649en
dc.descriptionΠεριέχει το πλήρες κείμενοel_GR
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, an essential aspect regarding the multilateral issue of under-representation of women in Computer Science (CS) is presented. It is based on research conducted with a sample of 77 students aged 17, 52 of which were girls. These students were about to decide on their future undergraduate studies. The goal of this study was to determine the factors affecting the decisions of both girls and boys whether or not to pursue undergraduate computer courses. Questionnaires were used, addressing issues in the following 4 main categories: a) the reasons students chose/chose not to study CS, b) the way students’ family and friends, the media and the school environment contribute to their decision, c) the students’ perception of their prospective future after studying CS and d) the students’ perception of the gender that better fits the profile of a computer scientist. The results were quite illuminating: a) more boys than girls choose to study CS. Boys and girls choose/choose not to study CS because they find/don’t find it an interesting subject and because of the employment opportunities rate of the CS industry. Motivation in choosing to study CS differs between boys and girls: the former are motivated by their former experience in using computers whereas the latter are mainly motivated by the employment opportunities of the CS industry: b) the surrounding social environment in terms of family, school, friends and media seemed to affect student choice of undergraduate studies in CS through communication, infrastructure and living examples: c) boys imagine themselves as computer scientists in a competitive and profitable job in the industry whereas girls emphasized that they would prefer permanency in their future jobs and are not overly concerned about the payment: d) regarding the profile of a computer scientist, a small percentage of boys expressed the opinion that men more than women suit this kind of profession, whereas almost all the girls stated that they find both men and women suitable.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherUniversity of Zilinaen
dc.relation.ispartofTesting/Assessmenten
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.titleEssential factors that affect students’ choices to study computer science: gender differencesen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/conferenceObjecten
dc.subject.uncontrolledtermComputer Scienceen
dc.subject.uncontrolledtermGender Differencesen
dc.subject.uncontrolledtermSecondary Educationen
dc.subject.uncontrolledtermUndergraduate Studiesen
dc.contributor.conferenceorganizerLearning in Science Group, University of Cyprusen


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